recruiting

#SheMeansBusiness Presents: Women at Work

Recently, Facebook stopped by our office to learn more about our Co-Creators, Kristen and Catherine, for their #shemeansbusiness series.

Watch the full video below!

Recruiting is For Lovers: Life as a Professional Cupid

By Kristen Harris

My reality television weakness is The Millionaire Matchmaker or the newer version Million Dollar Matchmaker. In case you haven’t seen it, Patti Stanger (The Matchmaker) runs a high-end dating service (Millionaire’s Club). Every week she and her team select two high-net-worth individuals, preview potential dates for them, set up a social mixer, orchestrate a “master date,” get feedback from both parties, then decide how to move forward. She’s from a long line of matchmakers and focuses on helping her clients find true love, not just a hot date.

Guess what? Recruiters are matchmakers too; we focus on work relationships instead of personal, but the premise is the same. Whether we’re filling a short-term project or a full-time position, we do all the same things. Select great clients, preview potential candidates, set up an initial phone screen, schedule an interview (or several), get feedback from both sides, then decide how to move forward. If all goes well, an offer is made because both the client and candidate have found true love (or at least a very strong like). When it’s not a match made in heaven for either side, we keep looking until we find the right fit.

Often Patti has to figure out what is “wrong” with the client. Why have they not found true love on their own? She identifies patterns, reasons they might be selecting the wrong people, or actions that turn off the kind of people they want to attract. Maybe they say they’re looking for one type of person, but all of the dates they choose are a totally different profile.

These are the same things recruiters do for our clients. We dig a little deeper to figure out what they really need, not just what they say they want. We ask questions to figure out what the real criteria should be. We identify what makes our client special so we can share those qualities with candidates. If we see culture, language, reputation, or anything else that may prevent our client from attracting the type of person they want, we try to help them resolve those issues. We help candidates see great qualities about the company that may not be immediately visible on the surface. We don’t let our clients settle for someone who is just okay, we want them to find the perfect match.

And we do all of the same things for our candidates as well. It’s just as important to Patti and her team that the millionaire’s date has a good time and feels a connection. If it’s not a great match on both sides, it just won’t work out in the long run—it won’t be true love. We think our client is great or we wouldn’t be working with them, but sometimes they’re just not a great fit for that particular candidate. We want to create long-lasting relationships, to help people find companies where they’ll stay and grow.

Recruiters are hopeless romantics. We truly believe every match we make is going to be perfect and, if it’s not, we always believe the next one will be. There is nothing more satisfying than knowing you’re the professional cupid that helped connect two great people. Celebrate and share the love!

 

Hiring: Plan Ahead, Ideal Fit Takes Time

By Kristen Harris

“Never make a decision until you have to.” – Randy Pausch

As hiring managers and job candidates, we’re all looking for an Ideal Fit. Whatever term you use to describe it, we all want to find someone who is a good fit for our team, or a work opportunity that feels “just right”. If you’re not sure how to assess an Ideal Fit, check out our article Hiring: What’s an “Ideal Fit”?

Finding the Ideal Fit takes time. It’s not something you can rush through, yet we’re often pressured to make quick decisions. Hiring managers need to quickly assess whether a candidate is the right fit for their team and realize that candidate is probably talking to other companies too. When you find the right person, you feel pressured to make an offer before someone else does.

On the other side, with all of the options and opportunities, candidates are getting offered roles more quickly and feel pressured to accept. They may get multiple offers and need to make the right choice for themselves and their career.

Finding the Ideal Fit takes time, but with all the pressure to make a quick decision, we don’t have time. How to resolve this seemingly impossible conundrum? By putting in our time beforehand, so we’re prepared to make a quick decision when the clock is ticking.

Never make a decision until you have to, but be prepared to make a decision when you need to. When you’ve spent time getting clear on what the Ideal Fit is for you, then it’s much easier to make that quick decision when the pressure is on.

For hiring managers, it’s important to be very clear on what matters to you, your company, and your team. Identify the must-haves vs nice-to-haves for any role you’re trying to fill. What is required for success in this role? What skills, experience or background are necessary? What type of personality traits or soft skills are you looking for? What’s important to your company? What is your culture like? Make a list of everything you’re looking for, ranked from most important to least.

For individuals seeking a new role, project, or work opportunity, you need to know what matters the most to you (and what doesn’t). Are you looking for higher pay? More interesting projects? The opportunity to learn new skills or grow the breadth of your work? To work with a particular person or for a certain company? Is flexibility or a specific work schedule important to you? Stability and predictability, or new exciting challenges every day? What kind of culture do you thrive in? Write it all down, in order of priority.

A prioritized list of what matters the most gives you a base to compare against when making decisions. Let’s be honest, no person or job is completely, 100% perfect. There will always be compromises. You need to know what matters most, your deal-breakers vs nice-to-haves.

When you’re clear on what’s most important, making decisions becomes easier, even under pressure. Compare every candidate or opportunity to your list. How does the person or role measure up against your must-haves? If all those boxes are checked, then look at the nice-to-haves. Those probably won’t all be covered, so decide where you’re willing to compromise. You’ve already set your priorities; you decided that the items lower on your list are less important to you. Now, take a breath, listen to your gut, and make your decision.

Finding the Ideal Fit takes time that we don’t have in the heat of the moment. By spending time beforehand to identify what’s most important, we can quickly make a better decision when the pressure is on.