job

How To Love Your Job (or at least make the most of it)

By Catherine Lang-Cline

Believe it or not, many, many people do love their job. The stars aligned and they found their calling in the field that they love with the team that works wonderfully together. It is actually possible that you can achieve this, too. It may require a few adjustments or it may require you getting what you need right now and then strategizing for your next move.

If you already love your job with no issues, congratulations! You are one of the lucky few and you may be able to guide others in making it a great job for them, too. Bear in mind, you can’t fix everyone and some people are just in the wrong place but you may be able to help. If you see coworkers struggling maybe offer them some thoughts on why you love your job. Maybe it is the flexibility or the opportunity. Sometimes it is a conversation about how what you do is helping people.

If you love your job except for maybe just one person that is also employed there, you might have to dig deep and be direct. Sometimes having a conversation with a person can fix a lot of things. If someone talks over you, constantly is late, is never accountable, etc., you will get better results if you approach that person and tell them how their action makes you feel or how it affects the team. The idea of this is not to lecture them, but rather see the results of their action. Going to HR could be a choice if you feel that it is beyond what you can handle but sometimes people are not self-aware and if a few small things can be rectified, you might have a little more love for your workplace.

Finally, you might just not be in the right place. The culture of the company may not match yours or the work style or the people. You can make the most of your situation by transferring to a new area or figuring out what you can add to your skill sets at this job to prepare you for the next. Can you take on new responsibilities? Can you work on leadership skills? Can you learn some new software or skill that might expand your career? It will definitely help the company you're currently working for and you all may like this change. You could possibly love your job! If all of that does not work, you have set the stage for the next step in your career. Don’t forget while you have a job you can work on passion projects or activities outside of work that can lead you in a new direction.

The point is if you are not in love with your job:

  1. Talk to someone at the company that is and find out why

  2. See if you can change things in your environment, you may need to speak up,

  3. Start looking at opportunities within the company to make a change or gather more experience for the next step in your career.


You spend more time at work than at home or with your family. You might as well spend that time at a place you like going to and being with people you like.


Get More Candidates with an Inviting Job Description

By Catherine Lang-Cline

You have a role to fill and you know exactly what skill sets you need. You start your long line of bullet points and it covers every single detail of what you are looking for in a candidate; the amount of experience required, software knowledge, responsibilities…. Check! Check! Check! It's perfection. Or is it completely boring?

Sure, all of these details are incredibly important, but does it sound interesting or inviting? Think about when you receive an invitation to an event. The details are what, where, time, and maybe who it may benefit. Party invitations include all of that too but instead, there is a line about, “Come celebrate!” or “Join us!” or “Don’t miss this!” Exciting, right?

Now a job is not a party but in order to get people interested in what is making your job description stand out over the others? The job market is tight, what would make them choose to go to your party, um... company, over another job offer? What are you offering or should be offering that would make your company the place to be?

Here are a few examples of bullet points that you could add to your next job description that will really attract candidates:

  • You can help grow

  • Collaborative environment

  • You will own… (as in be responsible for)

  • We love self-starters

  • You will work with an amazing team

  • Freedom to create

  • Free coffee!

  • Looking for people that believe in our mission

  • Flexible hours

I am guessing that you see the difference between this and a typical job description. It is basically building some excitement around being a part of your companies team. If you have a lengthy description that you really want to stick to, you could also have this welcoming invitation in a nice intro. Notice that it has nothing to do with foosball tables or bean bag chairs.

Still struggling? Not only would we love to help you re-craft your job description, we would love to help you find “the one” for your company. We invite you to contact us if you need help with this or any other workforce issues. We would be excited to help — portfoliocreative.com

Working with Mental Illness

By Annie Doherty

Working with mental illness is not always easy. Some days it’s all I can do to get out of bed, let alone look presentable and make it into the office where I have to interact with other people. Other times, my anxiety is so high I’m just waiting for some little thing to tip me over the edge into full-fledged panic. What I’ve learned, however, is that I need the structure of a job, going to a workplace, and the forced interaction with people. I recently got a new job and took two weeks off to work on some personal projects and relax before stepping into a new work environment. During those two weeks, the lack of structure was awful. It was incredibly difficult to get motivated to do anything and I began to be afraid to leave the house. 


    Having a job helps keep me strong in my fight against my brain. In one sense, it’s like I’m exercising those mental muscles that I need to help keep me functioning on a normal scale. If I don’t use them, they get weak and don’t always work the way I need them to. I need my brain to be actively diligent, aware of triggers and mood changes so that I can be prepared to react the best way possible. 


    I do have safeguards for when and if I feel the winds shifting in my brain. I have an arsenal of essential oils at my desk and in my purse for when my anxiety starts to spike. Whether or not the oils are really doing anything (because I know people love to argue both sides), the simple act of stopping what I’m doing and pausing to smell and apply them helps shift my brain’s focus. 


I’ve also been lucky to create friendships everywhere I’ve worked with people I’ve felt comfortable enough to share my story. Because of this, I’ve been able to have a support system at work. Simply telling a coworker that I’m high anxiety or struggling with a strong wave of depression can help keep things at bay. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve been more honest with my bosses.  I’ve been fortunate to work on teams and have bosses that are understanding. I’m also a firm believer in mental health days - because just like when you have a cold, sometimes you need to stay home when you don’t have any strength to get out of bed. 

Your Job is Really a Gig, and Why That’s a Good Thing

By Kristen Harris

You’ve probably heard a lot of talk about ‘gigs’ and the ‘gig economy’ lately, but may have thought it doesn’t apply to you. Here’s the deal–gigs aren’t just for Uber drivers and musicians anymore. We're all working in the gig economy. All jobs are becoming gigs. 

Work has been impacted by the Information Age, becoming more flexible and transient than ever before. For more information on gigs, jobs, and how the gig economy has evolved, check out the previous article Job vs. Gig: What’s the Difference and Why It Matters.

So, the gig economy is here, what does that mean to you?

First of all, your job is really a gig. While it may be salaried, Monday through Friday, 40ish hours a week, it’s still a gig. Why? Because all work is just-in-time, as-needed, and constantly evolving with company, industry, economic, social and political changes. We live in a highly connected international world, and that impacts all business and work.

This shift to an information-based world of work means that all jobs are based on current projects and needs. Those projects and needs constantly change, impacting the size and type of workforce needed. Which affects how companies hire, and how people manage their career.

Don’t despair, for people in the workforce this is a good thing! Skills and talents are valued, and opportunities are no longer (solely) based on seniority. Yes, someone with more experience may have different opportunities, but based on their level of knowledge and skill (read about Gladwell’s 10,000 Hour Rule), not just because they’ve been at the company longest.

There are very few industries left where seniority is the only consideration for promotion (ahem, airline pilots). Generally, your skills, talent, and willingness to learn leads to new opportunities. This means individuals can find new ways to apply and grow skills, gain new experiences, pursue interesting opportunities, and be paid in a way that equates with the value of what they bring to the table.

If there’s a downside to this whole gig economy, here it is–it’s harder. Finding your own way, blazing your trail, building your skills and promoting them to others is all harder than finding that one job right out of school and staying there for 30 years. This new world order requires more hustle than before. You’ll probably change employers more often, may have multiple careers, and will often find self-employment or flexible work arrangements to be the norm.

But upside of opportunities and control over your own career outweighs the downsides. Plus, the gig economy is here, so we all might as well figure out how to make it work. Hustle, and build the career you want. Your future is in your hands!